The “Lost” Welcome to Kafco strips.

When I first started drawing Welcome to Kafco strips for Global Revolution Comix, I was preoccupied with drawing the artwork for my upcoming graphic novel on labor history.  So I forgot to send these two strips over to Chris McCamic at Global Revolution and, when he launched the site, he ran the third strip I had drawn as “Episode 1,” because it was the first one I sent him.  So, for all the Kafco fans out there, I present the original two Welcome to Kafco comic strips!

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Here in the very first strip, we meet Chuckie and Katelyn, and I manage to reference both Charles Schultz and Franz Kafka in only four panels.  The text that the boss-droid is speaking came out hard to read.  It says, “Greetings, valued new associate, KATELYN2217@KAFCO.JOB.  Your teammate CHARLES9271 will be training you today.  By clicking below, you acknowledge that your employment at Kafco is at will.  Employees are subject to termination or transformation into giant vermin without notice.”

The next strip introduces the character Razzle, an homage to the character played by Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers  in the cult classic punk rock movie Suburbia by Penelope Spheeris, and introduces the idea that Chuckie is trying, very unsuccessfully, to form a union at Kafco, which will become more important as the strip develops.

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Welcome to Kafco #1

The first issue of my new weekly webcomic is up on Global Revolution Comix.  Check them out for other great stuff, including the serialized comic book, The Unionizer.

Does your job suck?  Does negotiating the daily grind of humiliation and bureaucratic absurdity leave you, at the end of every shift, with muscles twitching from exhaustion and a soul mired in a deep chasm of existential dread?

Before you burn the place to the ground, sneak off for a “bathroom break” and spend a minute relaxing with the gang from Kafco, for a look at the lighter side of earning a living in a dystopian hellscape.  LIke working at Kroger in a short story by Franz Kafka, the morning coffee is as bitter as the class struggle, and every cup comes out of your check.

Welcome to Kafco.

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